Wednesday, October 10, 2018

State awards $2.8 million for village and downtown projects

Governor Phil Scott was in the Northeast Kingdom Tuesday and while in Albany announced the allocation of $2.8 million in state tax incentives for 16 projects (including 2 in Springfield) supporting more than $324 million in downtown and village center construction and rehabilitation efforts.


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8 comments :

  1. Turning the Woolson Block back into "affordable housing" is a bad idea. High-tech office space or higher end housing would be better. Sadly, it seems the only way to get Govt. money for renovation projects is to cater to those who will benefit downtown the least; people on welfare. You CAN have an economy based on Govt. funding. The economy doesn't care where the money comes from, as long as it comes. It just won't be a healthy, sustainable economy that benefits everyone. Some of the other projects have some promise, but more low-income housing will be the kiss of death.

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  2. The only people promoting this renovation are those that will financially benefit, either directly or kick backs from administrating contracts. Think not? Start connecting the dots. The very best option for the community is to raze this white elephant and make the lot available for a new construction. While at it, also tear down the other worthless, vacant eye scores. Hell, the Odd Fellows building has sagged noticeably in just the last few months. A heavy, wet snow and it will be a pile of broken lumber. The bakery building isn't much better.

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    1. Although I completely agree with following the money, I don't think that tearing down the Woolson Block is the answer. New construction of what? Newer low income housing? The same people getting rich off of renovations will be involved in that, too. The Woolson Block isn't so bad looking that it can't be saved, I simply object to its proposed use. The other buildings, and the Parks and Woolson monstrosity are another story. Tear them down, as well as the dive rooming houses, and downtown may have a chance!

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  3. I find it interesting that other people in town agree with me that low income housing in the Square is not the way to go. I have stated this many times on this forum. It is clearly evident that our town fathers don't give a damn about what taxpayers think about anything.

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    1. 10:18, Get with the program. It's nothing more than a corrupt money grab. No one at arms length to the renovation is in favor of it. I've had ownership interest in similar, brick/masonry buildings of this vintage. Unless some unique history or architectural significance there is no economy in restoration. New construction is far more cost effective and efficient at every level. Same situation for the old high school, Christopher Mason building, bakery, Odd Fellows, and community house.

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    2. "Unique history" and "architectural significance" are matters of opinion. I once knew a man who owned a home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. He purchased it for $1.00, and moved it. The former owner saw no value in the house; he wanted to use the land for a parking lot! Selling it for a buck simply saved him the demolition cost. The Woolson Block may not even come close to that, but it is still a part of this town's history, and should be saved, since it can be. The other buildings are too far gone. On the other side, the town I grew up in went on a demolition rampage, and tore down many buildings in its downtown. Today, there are nothing but empty lots where some classic examples of American architecture used to be. A "movie palace" from the Silent Era was one of them. The remaining buildings are mostly bland, modern stuff from the 50's. Boring and ugly. Tear down the eyesores and unsafe buildings, but save as many as possible, even if it isn't the most cost-effective route. Preservation is worth the cost.

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  4. chuck gregory10/14/18, 5:50 PM

    "Affordable housing" does not mean renting to white trash anymore; most recent college graduates cannot get a mortgage, thanks to the same sort of lending that fueled the housing bubble. We should be planning to attract those people, and it should be of a quality to make their mouths water....

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    1. Chuck, you need to drive around Springfield more often. Yes, affordable housing should be of decent quality. That's not what you'll find here. Sagging roofs (some with trees growing out of them) peeling paint, bad plumbing, rodents, bugs, etc. And yes, sad to say it, some of the people living there do qualify as "white trash." Those recent college grads you speak of must be living somewhere else!

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